Articles Posted in Gas Explosions

Published on:

Explosion-225x300
NPGA Gas Check Program

The propane explosion which killed Edgar Brummett  of White County, Georgia was entirely preventable. According to published reports, the Georgia Propane Explosion was caused by a propane leak at a home in the Mt. Yonah Scenic Estates. A day prior to the explosion, the homeowner called the local propane gas supplier to report a leak, and also to report unusual propane usage over a short period of time…..strong evidence of a leak in the propane gas system. The propane company ignored, or, according to published reports, “disputed” the homeowners call about a leaking propane gas system and possible propane gas leak.

For decades, the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) has known about the dangers of gas leaks and the need to properly and thoroughly inspect a propane gas system when a customer reports a leak, gas service is initiated, or there is a change in tenancy at the property. As noted in the document below, in 1985, the NPGA developed and implemented its “GAS Check” program. The GAS Check program was an industry wide effort to reduce (or, eliminate) residential propane accidents. This was done with consumer and dealer education, and detailed propane dealer training. The Gas Check Program works to prevent propane explosions by provider rules and guidelines for:

Published on:

Propane-Explosion-300x225
A propane explosion in White County, Georgia killed Edgar Brummett. Mr. Brummett was at his grandson’s house in Sautee Nacoochee, Georgia, potentially investigating a suspected propane leak. Apparently, the 120 gallon ASME propane tank had been filled in December, and was already “out of gas” despite low use.

Suspecting an obvious gas leak, the homeowner apparently called the propane company, reported a gas leak, and the propane disputed the homeowners call. An “out of gas” call from a homeowner reporting a leak is a big, big deal in the propane world, and the local propane distributor (Tugalo gas) absolutely had a duty to red-tag the propane system and conduct a full system leak check AND pressure check pursuant to NFPA 58, the LP gas code.

The propane industry has known, for years, of the dangers and hazards of an “out of gas” system and a homeowner report of a leak. Often after accidents such as the one in Sautee Nacoochee, the propane company will be on the scene of the accident within hours, gathering propane samples to determine if the gas was adequately odorized and determining whether the system was up to code.

Published on:

A natural gas explosion ripped through a home Tuesday, destroying the structure and injuring two people. These explosions are more common that one would think, and they can cause massive damage to your home or Georgia workplace.

Natural gas leaking from an underground pipe apparently seeped into the home’s basement. The gas then gathered in the basement rafters, until something ignited it, causing the explosion.

Natural gas does not have an odor when it comes out of the ground—the odor is added by producers and distributors, as a safety measure. That odor, called “ethyl mercaptan,” is a warning agent in the event of leakage or spills. Often, when a natural gas explosion occurs and the home occupants do not escape, it’s because they didn’t “smell” the gas—often a result of the absence of ethyl mercaptan.

Published on:

A Georgia Power lineman was severely burned in a Georgia work accident while installing a utility pole in Milton, Georgia. Authorities say 25-year-old Kylan Warren of Acworth was caught in the explosion, and has suffered 80% burns to his entire body. Apparently, a device used to drill the hole for the utility pole struck the gas line, causing the explosion.

Prior to placing utility poles, the gas company is called out to the site to mark the location of the lines, so that when the lineman goes to the jobsite (where he probablly uses a digger derrick such as the one pictured below), he knows where to dig and where not to dig. A lineman is not expected to do anything other than rely on the marks placed by the gas company when setting up his digger derrick and placing the utility pole.

Thumbnail image for digger_20derrick_2001.jpg
Continue reading →

Published on:

Oil Refinery.jpg
Another oil refinery explosion has caused work injury and worker death, and has also led to the fling of workers compensation claims, this time in New Mexico. The Navajo Refinery, owned by Dallas, Texas based Holly Corp., exploded because the plant operator failed to follow safety instructions. According to a recently filed lawsuit, several workers were injured the the explosion, some suffering burn injury. Apparently, a large tank used to produce tar exploded, causing this incident.
Continue reading →

Published on:

Recently, the Chemical Safety Board (CSB) issued warning reminding employers and workers and the dangers pressure vessels pose to those working in industry. Atlanta injury attorneys often deal with burn injuries sustained as a result of industrial explosions caused by pressure vessels, including chemical tanks and gas tanks. If such vessels are improperly installed or welded, they may have inadequate pressure relief systems. The CSB noted several incidents related to pressure vessels, including a Louisiana gas explosion which killed 4 workers. The CSB also noted a Texas chemical explosion in Houston involving a pressurized tank which exploded, causing massive damage.  

 

Published on:

A Missouri gas can explosion victim who suffered third degree to his burns as a result of what is likely a defective gas can has, incredibly, been denied health benefits because his insurance company says he has a “pre-existing condition.” The explosion victim Darian Egan says he feels lucky to be alive and is working on recovery, but now will not be able to work or provide for his family. The denial of health benefits to Mr. Egan or any other burn injury victim is ridiculous and shows just how far the insurance industry will go to make money.
Continue reading →

Published on:

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) recently warned industrial workers to not clear natural gas lines indoors. CSB investigators believe the Slim Jim Explosion occurred while contractors installing a water heater vented natural gas inside the building, leading to the explosion which killed three and injured dozens more at the ConAgra Foods plant just south of Raleigh, North Carolina.
Continue reading →