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Heather Tyler, age 12, from Lakeland, Florida, was severely burned by a gas can explosion last month while standing near a bonfire. The gas can was apparently in the vicinity of the bonfire, emitted flammable gasoline vapors, and a slash fire started outside the can.

Because the gas can was not equipped with a 15 cent flame arrester, the external flash fire travelled into the gas can Heather was standing near, and caused that gas can to become, in essence, a bomb. 75 percent of Heather’s body was burned, and she is currently at Shriner’s Hospital in Cincinnati Ohio.

Gas can explosions are entirely preventable. Portable gas cans should have been equipped with a flame arrester to prevent flame propagation into the gas can. Blitz USA, the largest maker of gas cans, is in bankruptcy because of its gross negligence in failing to equip its cans with flame arresters. Scepter Canada and Midwest Can also made gas cans without flame arresters. ANY gas can without a flame arrester is defective.
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Recently a sub-contractor working at BWI near Baltimore, MD was killed in a construction accident. The worker was injured by a concrete paver vehicle. Although alive just after the accident, he died due to his work injuries at the hospital.

Maryland Transportation Authority police are investigating the incident. The worker was employed by a subcontractor, Hi-Way Paving Inc. The company is working on a concrete paving project near the south side of the airport.

Workplace injuries and deaths are generally preventable with routine safety programs and basic hazard communication. OSHA must investigate any work injury event involving a death or the hospitalization of three or more workers. On a complex construction project,

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A fine of more than $1 million was recently delivered to a mine owner following two fatalities.

The Department of Labor has fined operators of an Ouray, Colorado silver mine $1.077 million for repeated, blatant safety violations that led to the “entirely preventable” deaths of two workers last year.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration’s report found that, ignoring regulations and repeated warnings, the operators of the Revenue Mine disposed of deteriorating explosives by detonating them inside of the mine, filling it with toxic gas. They did not seal off or ventilate the area and ignored complaints from miners who fell ill from the fumes.

Two miners on that evening shift became ill while working in that area and retreated from the mine. A third miner also returned to the surface after encountering what he called “bad air.”

Despite complaints to mine management from the three miners, no action was taken to identify, correct or report the hazardous condition in the drift. When explosives are detonated, carbon monoxide is released into the atmosphere. It is a toxic gas that can pose a serious risk to workers in an underground mine.

The following morning, two members of the day-shift crew traveled into the drift to observe the results of the shots fired on the previous day.

One of the miners, Nick Cappanno, who had one month of mining experience, was overcome by toxic levels of carbon monoxide, while the other miner was able to retreat from the area. In an attempt to rescue Cappanno, the shift boss, Rick Williams, entered the drift and was also overcome by carbon monoxide.

MSHA investigators determined that the fatal accident occurred due to management’s failure to dispose of deteriorated explosives in a safe manner. The explosives were detonated in an area of the mine that was not ventilated, and no post-blast examination was conducted.

Management also failed to take any action when two miners went into the unventilated Monogahela Drift and reported feeling ill, and it failed to withdraw miners as a result of the imminent danger created by the blast. Management did not establish an accurate and viable ventilation plan, barricade or seal un ventilated areas, or properly train new employees on mine health and safety procedures.

As a result of its investigation, MSHA issued eight unwarrantable failure orders, including six designated as flagrant workplace safety violations. A flagrant violation is defined as “a reckless or repeated failure to make reasonable efforts to eliminate a known violation of a mandatory safety and health standard that substantially and proximate caused, or reasonably could have been expected to cause, death or serious bodily injury.”
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BHO explosions, which occur during the manufacturing of butane hash oil, are occurring frequently in states with legalized cannabis. BHO involves forcing butane through filtered tube –often PVC pipe or specially made glass tubes sold for the purpose of producing butane hash oil. The liquid is captured in a container and heated, in order to “burn off” the butane.

During this process, butane vapors escape and are present in explosive levels. Unbeknownst to most consumers, the butane vapors are highly explosive, and making butane hash oil creates a substantial risk of injury because of the presence of flammable vapors. Once the vapors hit any flame–such as a spark, water heater pilot, furnace, or cigarette—a large explosion will occur.
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An fracking accident at a hydraulic fracturing site in northern Colorado killed one worker and seriously injured two others in a serious oilfield accident Thursday, authorities said.

The three men were trying to heat a frozen high-pressure water line at the oil or gas well site when it ruptured, Weld County sheriff’s Sgt. Sean Standridge said. One man was hit by a stream of water and died from the impact.

The injured men — Thomas Sedlmayr, 48, and Grant Casey, 28 — were flown to hospitals. The name of the man who was killed was not released.

“The pipe was frozen and they were trying to heat it up to get it flowing again,” Standridge said.

The temperature in the area was about zero degrees at the time of the accident, National Weather Service meteorologist Bob Kleyla said. Overnight, the temperature had dropped to minus 5, which is severe but not as cold as in other locations in Colorado such as Denver International Airport, where the low was minus 14.

The men were working for Halliburton Co., which Anadarko Petroleum Corp. contracted to perform fracking operations at the well. Fracking involves injecting high-pressure mixtures of water, sand or gravel, and chemicals into the ground to extract oil and gas from rock.
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When a diagnosis of mesothelioma is made, the first question usually asked is “what are my treatment options?” Often, those with mesothelioma are hesitant to start chemotherapy, because of the perceived side effects which can often accompany the treatment.

While chemotherapy can still carry severe side effects, modern medicine has made cancer treatment far less miserable than it was even 10 years ago. There are different types of mesothelioma chemotherapy: systemic therapy (injections), intrapleural (directly into the chest) and intrapertioneal (into the abdomen) are the most common. Chemotherapy is the main treatment (along with radiation therapy) and slows the progression of the disease. This allows for a higher quality of life.
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Georgia mesothelioma attorney and work injury lawyer was recently featured in the Fulton County Daily Report, Atlanta’s daily legal newspaper, for the result achieved in the Bradley vs. Procter & Gamble and Fru-Con Constructionmatter. On January 1, 2011, Michael Bradley was injured while working on a pressurized system at the P&G facility in Augusta, Georgia. Jonah Flynn brought claims against the designers of the system upon which Mr. Bradley was working, as well as claims against the Procter & Gamble Company, the parent organization to Mr. Bradley’s employer, Procter & Gamble Manufacturing Company. After lengthy discovery, the Mr. Bradley’s claims were favorably resolved.

FCDR Article-Flynn-Bradley Case.pdf
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Georgia mesothelioma lawyer Jonah Flynn was recently retained to represent the interests of the estate of a retired Dupont salesman who spent his career in and out of textile mills. Asbestos was heavily used in the manufacture of certain types of woven products, and much of what was made in textile mills from the 1940s to the 1970s was made with asbestos. This makes textile workers especially at risk of developing mesothelioma.

Asbestos exposure in textile mills occurred when raw asbestos was spun into yarn and then woven into woven products. There was also asbestos material in the textile mills themselves (i.e. asbestos pipe covering and insulation) which also can cause disease. Studies have shown that textile mill workers have significantly greater odds for developing asbestosis and mesothelioma.

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The Flynn Law Firm is pleased to report that it has resolved an industrial accident lawsuit brought by a Procter & Gamble employee against the Procter & Gamble Company and others responsible for designing and installing an industrial system in Augusta, Georgia.

On January 1, 2010, Plaintiff Michael Bradley was performing maintenance on a paste agglomeration (PAG) supply line when, without warning, a caustic solution used in the manufacture of household detergents struck him in the face, causing severe injury. The Defendants had a role in the design, construction, installation or maintenance of the system upon which Mr. Bradley was working at the time of his incident or, alternatively, manufactured products which were a part of that system. Procter & Gamble Company was the parent company of Plaintiff’s employer, Procter and Gamble Manufacturing Company, and was added as a separate party to the case.

The PAG system upon which Mr. Bradley was working at the time of his injury is a complicated piping system used to make paste agglomerate, an ingredient in powdered laundry detergents such as Tide and Gain. In 2004, P&G initiated “Project Flood to change the PAG system so that the paste agglomerate it created could be made using new ingredients and different processes. In the area where Michael Bradley was injured, the piping was reconfigured to allow for splitting of paste between one of two mixers. In so doing, two manual valves were moved from the fourth floor of the building to the ceiling of the third floor. Because the valves were in the ceiling of the third floor, over twenty feet from the ground, the valves were automated. Michael Bradley was injured when one of the valves failed to open Continue reading →

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One of the victims of the Louisiana Plant Explosion in Giesmar, Louisiana, 29 year-old Zach Green of Hammond, Louisiana, was laid to rest yesterday. Zach Green had a “heart of gold” according to his friends. “Zachary was very energetic,” Giovingo said. “He had a heart of gold. He loved, loved, loved his sister Holly…He would do anything for friends and family. He was one of those rare gems that God had blessed you with.”

At least 77 others were injured in the blast, and Williams Olefins explosion victims have been sent to burn units in Baton Rouge and Gonzales for burn care. It’s unclear what caused the explosion and subsequent fire, but the plant manufactures propylene and ethylene, chemicals that are highly flammable.
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